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Living in an Aging World
future-of-cities23

Reprinted from Longitudes

Cities need to adjust policies and rethink resources to support an aging demographic.

The world’s top 750 cities will experience profound demographic shifts over the next 15 years. For one, the world will be urbanizing rapidly: by 2030, the populations of these leading cities will increase by an estimated 410 million.

What’s more, the changes in birth rates and the longer life spans will have a transformative effect on housing patterns, labor participation, and infrastructure use.

Almost everywhere, urban populations are aging. According to Oxford Economics’ Global Cities report, more than 150 million additional residents over age 65 will populate the world’s top cities by 2030. And roughly 40 percent of these seniors – or 61 million – will live in China’s leading cities.

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Rethinking Transportation in Cities
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Reprinted from Longitudes

Creating more livable cities through accessible public transportation.

In previous posts, I’ve discussed the growing pains that come along with major urban development—congestion, air and noise pollution, etc.—as well as some of the creative solutions that cities have come up with to combat these issues.

One of the most effective ways for a city to decrease congestion and pollution—and become safer, more livable, and more attractive to those looking to move to the city—is a strong network of public transportation.

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Getting Smart about Cities in India
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Reprinted from Longitudes

India takes on the challenge of building smarter cities.

The cities of the future are all but certain to confront a number of unique challenges. Across the globe, cities are expected to experience enormous gains in population, with most of the growth concentrated in the developing world.

These cities of the future will need to balance the basic demands of a growing population against concerns for the environment, economic sustainability, and the logistics required to simply keep these enormous cities running. Planning for this future is made more complicated by the dearth of usable data.

Enter the smart city.

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Sanitation: A Key to Urban Growth
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Cities across the world need innovative, sustainable systems to help address obstacles created by growing populations.

Reprinted from Longitudes

As the world’s urban population continues to multiply, a multitude of challenges loom on the horizon.

According to an Oxford Economics study of 750 cities worldwide, the population of these urban areas is expected to increase by 410 million by the year 2030.

And while incomes are set to increase across the board, cities will exhibit significant divergence in their growth patterns:

  • Developed cities will grow slowly but demonstrate technological innovation.
  • Cities that are “emerging” will have to work to achieve parity with their more advanced counterparts, but will take years to catch up in areas like per capita GDP.

Clearly, meeting the challenges of future cities will require innovative, sustainable solutions.

In no area is this more apparent than in basic services like sanitation, which can rapidly transport a country from the 19th century to the 21st — and improve health and quality of life for the population.

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Unique Cities Demand Unique Planning
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How cities, old and new, can plan for the long term.

Reprinted from Longitudes

Today’s generation of urban planners are often influenced by the work of the late MIT professor Kevin Lynch, who, in his seminal 1960 book, The Image of the City, described the way human perceptions of the city—the way people orient themselves and navigate within a physical space—should affect city design.

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Sustainability as a Platform for City Growth
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Cities are revamping their sustainability plans with fresh, innovative solutions.

Reprinted from Longitudes

Populations in the world’s largest 750 cities are expected to grow by 410 million between now and 2030.

According to Oxford Economics’ Global Cities report, which UPS co-sponsored and whose data I’ll draw upon here, we can attribute this growth in large part to the migration from the farm to the cities across developing economies.

This migration is spurred by young people drawn by economic opportunities and the excitement urban environments offer, the rising cost of long-distance commuting — and the sheer fact that for many across the globe, the pace of city living is becoming more attractive.

As I discussed in my last post, this rapid urbanization signals that strong economic growth for cities is likely to be on the way—but there will be a need for large-scale investments and creative development to allow cities to adapt to their evolving needs.

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The Future Belongs to Cities—But They Will Face Challenges
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Making urban futures cleaner, greener, safer and healthier through sophisticated planning and logistics.

Reprinted from Longitudes

There’s a growing consensus that to understand the future of the world, you must focus on the future of cities. Over the next few months, I will use this blog to highlight how well-planned urban development — combined with focused environmental consideration – can work in unison to make our collective urban futures cleaner, greener, safer and healthier. I’ll also show how sophisticated planning and logistics can help accelerate these changes.

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Biomethane: The Greenest Alternative Fuel of All?
UPS package car in London

This week, UPS announced the deployment of 10 dual-fuel biomethane-diesel vehicles in the United Kingdom. The addition of biomethane fuel technology to our diverse fleet is potentially very exciting, as biomethane is one of the world’s most environmentally friendly vehicle fuels yet.

Biomethane is a renewable energy source produced from organic waste, in this case derived from a landfill.  Biomethane has unique properties and provides a number of environmental benefits. It has great potential for reducing carbon – each unit of biomethane cuts emissions well-to-wheel by 70% compared to diesel. Also, it reduces our dependency on fossil fuels. And it’s also one of the few alternative fuels that supports long-haul, heavy end trucks used for moving package trailers.

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