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Diagnosing the Clinical Lab Workflow
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Fortune favors the prepared mind

Louis Pasteur

The concept of disease was first introduced by Hippocrates more than two thousand years ago [1]. 1. Hundreds of years later, pioneers like Louis Pasteur and Robert Koch demonstrated to the world how a microscope can identify of the causes of diseases.  Today, Clinical Lab is a $50 billion industry in the United States alone and medical diagnostic testing influences 70% of all healthcare treatment decisions [2].

The 21st century Clinical Lab exemplifies the rapid pace of implementing advances in technology and science to facilitate the efficient and accurate diagnosis of medical conditions.  For example, tests which were unimaginable a few years ago, are routinely completed in just a few hours today.

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How Modern Healthcare Grinds to a Halt: Drug Shortages
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Surprisingly, one of the biggest challenges in healthcare over the past five years has been a shortage of pharmaceuticals.  From 2006 to 2011 drug shortages grew by 400%.[1]   It is now a common practice for hospital pharmacies to maintain lists of which pharmaceuticals are available for physicians to prescribe.  

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The Return of the House Call
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How long did you spend in the waiting room for your last visit to a doctor?  Until the 1950’s, house calls comprised forty-percent of all physician-patient encounters.[1] The tradition of house calls can be traced back thousands of years as evidenced by citations in Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey.[2] As a time honored tradition, the house call offers many benefits; however. By 1980, the concept of house calls was all but extinct with less than one percent of patient encounters occurring within the home. 

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Demographics are Destiny: How the ‘Gray Tsunami’ is Changing Healthcare
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A famous saying in both politics and business is “demographics are destiny.” Demographics provide a picture of what a society looks like today and can also be used to understand trends that change a population over time. 

 A good example of the way that demographics can change a society is in the generation born after World War II. After the declining birthrates of the 1930’s, there was a huge increase in family growth as soldiers returned home. More than 50 years ago, Business Week coined the phrase “Baby Boomers” to describe the twelfth, and largest, generation born in America of 77 million who’ve been since then called the “love generation,”  “me generation,” and as they enter retirement, “the Gray Tsunami.”

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What Keeps Healthcare Executives Up at Night
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Today’s healthcare executive faces the most increasingly complex regulatory environment seen since the enactment of Medicare in 1965.  In addition to federal standards, they must comply with state regulations and the regulations for each country in which their company conducts business. Considering the scope and range of the fast changing healthcare regulatory environment – is it any wonder healthcare executives lose sleep over regulatory compliance?

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