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Targeting Online Replacement and Upgrade Auto Parts Shoppers
Exhaust pipe

For many shoppers, buying auto parts bears little resemblance to their father’s trip to the local store. That’s because the growth of e-commerce has forever changed the way consumers shop. While certainly a cause for adaptation, you need not fear for your business.

In fact, these are times of great opportunity for retailers.

Online automotive aftermarket sales are now responsible for 6%, or $5 billion, of all aftermarket parts purchases, according to the Auto Care Association’s E-tailing in the Automotive Aftermarket study. Perhaps even more telling, digital sales will account for a quarter of total automotive aftermarket sales by 2023. Read More »

About Stephen Hewitt

Stephen Hewitt is the Automotive Industry Marketing Analyst at UPS.
DIY Versus DIFM Auto Parts Sales – How Do You Steer Online Growth?
Machanic Working on a Car Engine

By now you know the stats. The average age of automobiles will climb beyond its current record of 11.4 years. Automotive aftermarket e-tail revenue is projected to double within three years. There is significant revenue potential for your business. But your web presence will need more than a quick tune-up to capture your share of incremental sales.

Who is shopping online and what are they looking for? Let’s take a look at the dynamics around DIY (do-it-yourself) vs. DIFM (do-it-for-me) consumers and the differences in their purchase trends.

According to the Auto Care Association’s E-tailing in the Automotive Aftermarket study, which surveyed both technicians and end consumers, 16 percent of replacement parts purchased within the last six months were installed by customers. This varies greatly from the results found in UPS’s What’s Driving the Automotive Parts Online Shopper study by comScore, which focused solely on the end-consumer. This study found that significantly more, 63% of replacement parts buyers and 51% of upgrade buyers, consumers install parts themselves. Read More »

Moving the Floor to the Final Four

It’s a good bet that when Kentucky, Wisconsin, Michigan State and Duke take to the court for the NCAA Men’s Final Four this weekend in Indianapolis, the last thing on the minds of the players will be the wood beneath their feet.

But if they only knew the lengths to which a 143-year-old business rooted in Amasa, Mich., went to source, build and transport college basketball’s most prestigious court to the site of the NCAA Final Four, they might have a greater appreciation for all that hardwood. Read More »

The Changing Face of American Manufacturing

Management innovation is just as important as new technology

Thomas Edison once said: “Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.” As someone with an up-close view of the evolution underway in manufacturing, I can vouch for the opportunities that await those willing to invest the work that will make them a reality.
Innovation is the American worker’s most prolific and valuable product.

Creating the concepts for new products and turning ideas into reality holds a romantic appeal for many and is highly prized among business leaders. But after outsourcing an incredible number of jobs two generations ago, our country — once a bastion for manufacturing design and production — has struggled to maintain an adequately skilled workforce that could continue to fill the innovation pipeline. Read More »

Responsible Electronics Recycling
Photo courtesy of HP

Electronic devices are integral to our daily lives: we use them to get our work done, we like how they help us connect with others through video, e-mailing and texting; we track our fitness activities and goals, and we rely on them to deliver our movies, music, news, photos, reports and, yes, even cat videos. Read More »

Introducing Longitudes: UPS’s Thought Leadership Blog

Click here to check it out.

We live in an era of great change and disruption. We also live in a world where many aspects of business are being disrupted by innovative cutting-edge technologies and innovative ways of thinking. Old business models are being challenged by advances in mobile and cloud computing, big data, crowdsourcing and 3D printing. While these changes carry risks, they also create extraordinary opportunities for the companies that can capitalize on these trends.

Read More »

Doing More, Not Less

The following post first appeared on the BlueGreen Alliance website on September 10, 2014.   

“At UPS, sustainability success starts with employees, not just newer and better technology.” 

Sustainability is often about creating or doing less—less waste, lower emissions. But is that the right approach?

What if, instead, we were committed to doing more?

Many corporate sustainability reports look and feel the same, but the best ones tell a story—what a company did, how it is leading, and what it is doing to take ownership of environmental and social concerns. Read More »

Veterans Give a ‘Competitive Edge’ to UPS

The following post was written by Steve B. Brooks and originally appeared on The American Legion website.

United Parcel Service, better known to the world as UPS, has 24,000 veterans on its payroll and has a goal of hiring thousands more. Hundreds of its stores are run by veterans.

But Myron Gray, vice president of U.S. Operations for the shipping giant, told delegates to the 96th Annual American Legion National Convention on Aug. 28 that his company’s hiring practices aren’t driven solely by a sense of obligation. Read More »

The Most Important Sustainability Question at UPS

What is the most energy-efficient way to deliver a package from point A to point B? It’s a good question. And for the legion of engineers at UPS, it’s more than that—it’s a compelling challenge that has profound implications for the global environment.

Let me elaborate. Given a set of parameters like origin, destination, and package weight, I could give you an answer to the question. But as with most things, the technical reality complicates the simplicity of rote formula. Read More »

UPS Pioneers New Global Sustainability Reporting Framework

By Patrick Browne and Joe Monfort

The Global Reporting Initiative (GRI), the most widely used sustainability reporting framework in the world, issued its fourth generation of guidelines in May 2013.  These new guidelines (called “G4”) are the most significant update to the reporting framework since 2006.  They emphasize identifying the most material sustainability issues for your organization and articulating how your organization manages these issues. Read More »