Welcome to upside

Living in an Aging World
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Reprinted from Longitudes

Cities need to adjust policies and rethink resources to support an aging demographic.

The world’s top 750 cities will experience profound demographic shifts over the next 15 years. For one, the world will be urbanizing rapidly: by 2030, the populations of these leading cities will increase by an estimated 410 million.

What’s more, the changes in birth rates and the longer life spans will have a transformative effect on housing patterns, labor participation, and infrastructure use.

Almost everywhere, urban populations are aging. According to Oxford Economics’ Global Cities report, more than 150 million additional residents over age 65 will populate the world’s top cities by 2030. And roughly 40 percent of these seniors – or 61 million – will live in China’s leading cities.

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The Logistics of Love
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Reprinted from Longitudes

Don’t worry, guys – Valentine’s Day puts pressure on supply chains, too.

Whether a man is calm and on top of his game, or in the grip of a last-minute panic, when he walks out of the flower shop with a fresh bouquet of Valentine’s Day flowers, chances are he doesn’t give much thought to how they got there.

He – and I’m being gender-specific because 75 percent of Valentine’s flower buyers are men – can thank a system built on a rigorous combination of distance, travel, time, temperature and dedicated UPSers.

It all comes together in a one-day observance that generates a total of $1.7 billion spent on flowers, which contribute to a total of nearly $19 billion spent on cards, romantic dinners, stuffed animals and all manner of other Valentine’s Day gifts – including everything from frozen steaks and lobsters to six-foot teddy bears.

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Rethinking Transportation in Cities
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Reprinted from Longitudes

Creating more livable cities through accessible public transportation.

In previous posts, I’ve discussed the growing pains that come along with major urban development—congestion, air and noise pollution, etc.—as well as some of the creative solutions that cities have come up with to combat these issues.

One of the most effective ways for a city to decrease congestion and pollution—and become safer, more livable, and more attractive to those looking to move to the city—is a strong network of public transportation.

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Getting Smart about Cities in India
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Reprinted from Longitudes

India takes on the challenge of building smarter cities.

The cities of the future are all but certain to confront a number of unique challenges. Across the globe, cities are expected to experience enormous gains in population, with most of the growth concentrated in the developing world.

These cities of the future will need to balance the basic demands of a growing population against concerns for the environment, economic sustainability, and the logistics required to simply keep these enormous cities running. Planning for this future is made more complicated by the dearth of usable data.

Enter the smart city.

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How Small Businesses Make a Big Difference
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Global ecommerce empowers businesses and their customers

Traveling the world for business and pleasure brings a tremendous amount of opportunities to learn and connect with people. When we founded cooper & ella women’s apparel, we wanted to make a positive impact through planned philanthropic giving. As part of our journey, we called on many domestic and international colleagues. Those relationships opened up many exciting places including Bangalore, India.

Bangalore has much in common with other thriving metropolitan areas around the world. Steeped in tradition and a rich heritage, the area has evolved to become a hub for global commerce, education and research. Its citizens work hard to provide for their families. A mixture of ancient temples and modern buildings blankets the landscape amidst a temperate climate that’s inviting to outdoor living and tourism. Read More »

The Changing Face of American Manufacturing
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Management innovation is just as important as new technology

Thomas Edison once said: “Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.” As someone with an up-close view of the evolution underway in manufacturing, I can vouch for the opportunities that await those willing to invest the work that will make them a reality.
Innovation is the American worker’s most prolific and valuable product.

Creating the concepts for new products and turning ideas into reality holds a romantic appeal for many and is highly prized among business leaders. But after outsourcing an incredible number of jobs two generations ago, our country — once a bastion for manufacturing design and production — has struggled to maintain an adequately skilled workforce that could continue to fill the innovation pipeline. Read More »

Responsible Electronics Recycling
Photo courtesy of HP

Electronic devices are integral to our daily lives: we use them to get our work done, we like how they help us connect with others through video, e-mailing and texting; we track our fitness activities and goals, and we rely on them to deliver our movies, music, news, photos, reports and, yes, even cat videos. Read More »

Sanitation: A Key to Urban Growth
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Cities across the world need innovative, sustainable systems to help address obstacles created by growing populations.

Reprinted from Longitudes

As the world’s urban population continues to multiply, a multitude of challenges loom on the horizon.

According to an Oxford Economics study of 750 cities worldwide, the population of these urban areas is expected to increase by 410 million by the year 2030.

And while incomes are set to increase across the board, cities will exhibit significant divergence in their growth patterns:

  • Developed cities will grow slowly but demonstrate technological innovation.
  • Cities that are “emerging” will have to work to achieve parity with their more advanced counterparts, but will take years to catch up in areas like per capita GDP.

Clearly, meeting the challenges of future cities will require innovative, sustainable solutions.

In no area is this more apparent than in basic services like sanitation, which can rapidly transport a country from the 19th century to the 21st — and improve health and quality of life for the population.

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Unique Cities Demand Unique Planning
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How cities, old and new, can plan for the long term.

Reprinted from Longitudes

Today’s generation of urban planners are often influenced by the work of the late MIT professor Kevin Lynch, who, in his seminal 1960 book, The Image of the City, described the way human perceptions of the city—the way people orient themselves and navigate within a physical space—should affect city design.

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The Consumer-led Revolution
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How social and mobile media are shaking up retail.

Reprinted from Longitudes

It’s interesting how phrases from the pioneering days of the retail industry have stayed with us. Well over a century ago, Marshall Field said: “Right or wrong, the customer is always right.” R.H. Macy added: “Be everywhere. Do everything. And never fail to astonish the customer.”

Neither could we have known how literally those statements apply today, how powerfully they have been enabled by a revolution in technology, or how fundamentally they are changing the face of retail around the world.

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