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How to Earn Extra Money During the Holidays
Holiday delivery

The holidays can be quite expensive—this is no secret. So the question becomes, how do I make some extra money during the holiday season to help cover those gifts? Or maybe, how can I bring in some spending money during that break between college semesters? The short answer: Become a UPS seasonal helper.

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Want to be Santa’s Helper? We’re Hiring Seasonal Employees
Holiday delivery

Could you use some extra money to help pay for those extra holiday gifts?

A recent survey reports that Americans have spent about $650 per household on holiday gifts for loved ones over the past two years. As my household continues to grow, I’d say that number is conservative.

UPS is currently hiring approximately 1,000 seasonal employees in the Louisville area, with jobs starting at $20 an hour for full-time seasonal drivers. Driver helpers are also needed, with those jobs starting at $12.88 an hour. There’s also a need for part-time package handlers who work a few hours each day starting at $8.50 an hour. Both day and night-shift positions are available.

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Ever Wonder What it Takes to Wear Those Brown Shorts?

Maybe more than you think. Today’s UPS driver must focus on more than just the physical tasks of delivering your package. As the company’s most visible representatives, they’re also expected to have a broad knowledge base of our products and services and know how to interact well with our customers.

That’s why we have UPS Integrad, an innovative driver training program that helps new drivers make sense of it all. The state-of-the-art program was developed as a result of almost two years of research that UPS did with some of the best minds at MIT and Virginia Tech. It incorporates technology in the form of virtual reality and simulations with classroom-based training, allowing trainees to “learn by doing.” 

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Mr. Four 25s: Profile of a UPS Driver

UPS is well known as a company that promotes from within. I’m a great example of that policy in action. I started with UPS in 1978 while still in high school. I was 17 and remember how intimidating the hub environment felt to me. Years later I would consider that hub, a maze of conveyor belts and steel girders, my second home. And exactly 10 years after I started with UPS I was still there, but instead of loading trucks I was riding on one with a driver in the ultra-rural northwest corner of Wisconsin. My job at that juncture was to produce a monthly magazine that UPSers in Wisconsin received in their homes.

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